New images released of mixed use complex near Sutton train station

First look at plans for £90m Sutton Point development

First look at plans for £90m Sutton Point development

First published in News
Last updated
by , Reporter

Here is the first glimpse at new CGI images of the £90m Sutton Point development near Sutton train station.

CNM Estates, the development company in charge of transforming the run down space into a burgeoning public plaza, has released new pictures following a public consultation.

Over two days on February 12 and 13, residents visited the Holiday Inn to get a sneak preview of plans for the site.

The scheme, which could see work completed by 2015, is set to deliver 300 apartments, a 130 bed hotel, as well as shops and restaurants which will centre around a public plaza joined to the proposed tram hub.

CNM Estates' chairman, Wahid Samady, said: "We wanted to take our time and get this right. The months of working with local people, businesses and the council seems to have paid off. I am sure that together we can create a landmark regeneration that the whole town will be proud of."

The exhibition was attended by more than 100 people and many have also visited the virtual exhibition online at www.suttonpoint.co.uk where people can have their say on the development until the end of the month.

Associate director for CNM, James Robson, said: "CNM Estates is very pleased to be investing in Sutton and we are delighted with the response we are receiving to our Sutton Point scheme."

In November it was announced that two massive developments costing £140m were planned for either end of the high street.

The other development, by LXB, will see shops, a hotel and a large Sainsbury's supermarket built on the site of the old gas works site.

It is hoped the two schemes will create 1,250 jobs and transform Sutton town centre.

 

 

Comments (5)

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1:14pm Wed 27 Feb 13

ResidentTony says...

Looks and sounds good. Very good in fact.

(It's worth clicking on the second image for an all-round view.)
Looks and sounds good. Very good in fact. (It's worth clicking on the second image for an all-round view.) ResidentTony
  • Score: 2

3:48pm Wed 27 Feb 13

GreenBrown says...

The final nail in the coffin of Sutton as a suburban Town.

The 1250 jobs thing is nothing to boast about. If the development has 300 apartments then that could mean an extra 1000+ people or more moving to the area taking that 'benefit' away.

How is more population density a good thing and a progressive move? Are there not traffic jams in the morning already. Do we have an abundance of school places for even more children. Do you not have to queue, queue and queue again in every bloody bank and shop and then there's the shrinking public services. It can take weeks to get an appointment with your doctor round here. Police numbers are going down and we might not have a local A&E soon. How does this 'look and sound good'? It's just another example of local government and national government mismanagement.

Still, its easy to impress the simpletons with nice new shiny things and these companies have got to make lots of money out of us so why not. I mean, they'll be employing all the local unemployed builders and labourers to help build the things won't they?........yeah right.
The final nail in the coffin of Sutton as a suburban Town. The 1250 jobs thing is nothing to boast about. If the development has 300 apartments then that could mean an extra 1000+ people or more moving to the area taking that 'benefit' away. How is more population density a good thing and a progressive move? Are there not traffic jams in the morning already. Do we have an abundance of school places for even more children. Do you not have to queue, queue and queue again in every bloody bank and shop and then there's the shrinking public services. It can take weeks to get an appointment with your doctor round here. Police numbers are going down and we might not have a local A&E soon. How does this 'look and sound good'? It's just another example of local government and national government mismanagement. Still, its easy to impress the simpletons with nice new shiny things and these companies have got to make lots of money out of us so why not. I mean, they'll be employing all the local unemployed builders and labourers to help build the things won't they?........yeah right. GreenBrown
  • Score: -5

6:58pm Wed 27 Feb 13

SouthLondoner65 says...

GreenBrown, either you're trolling on this page or you're just completely deluded. The fact of the matter is, the buildings look great and they will attract a good class of person to live and invest in Sutton. The current site is an eyesore that anyone in their right mind would want improving; weeds, gravel, graffiti and an empty, battered 60s block is hardly something I want to rest my eyes on. The new development however, is! Modern, sleek architecture in a prime TOWN CENTRE location that's already on the up makes huge financial sense (as well as vastly improving a big local site- which anyone should automatically be pleased about) for both the developer and for current residents. The development will undeniably improve Sutton and make it a nicer place to live, which will probably increase our house prices too and sooner rather than later put Sutton on the map as a very nice place to live in south London (especially combined with the Sutton North development scheme). I may be inclined to agree with GreenBrown if the development were in a small, rural village because it would be so hugely out of place and ruin the community spirit. Sutton is not a small, rural village. It's a large town within the boundaries of Greater London, a mega city. To conclude, I'd say 'better late than never!'
GreenBrown, either you're trolling on this page or you're just completely deluded. The fact of the matter is, the buildings look great and they will attract a good class of person to live and invest in Sutton. The current site is an eyesore that anyone in their right mind would want improving; weeds, gravel, graffiti and an empty, battered 60s block is hardly something I want to rest my eyes on. The new development however, is! Modern, sleek architecture in a prime TOWN CENTRE location that's already on the up makes huge financial sense (as well as vastly improving a big local site- which anyone should automatically be pleased about) for both the developer and for current residents. The development will undeniably improve Sutton and make it a nicer place to live, which will probably increase our house prices too and sooner rather than later put Sutton on the map as a very nice place to live in south London (especially combined with the Sutton North development scheme). I may be inclined to agree with GreenBrown if the development were in a small, rural village because it would be so hugely out of place and ruin the community spirit. Sutton is not a small, rural village. It's a large town within the boundaries of Greater London, a mega city. To conclude, I'd say 'better late than never!' SouthLondoner65
  • Score: 2

8:02pm Wed 27 Feb 13

GreenBrown says...

No troll, I comment on many stories on this site. You on the other hand could be connected to this in someway. You write like your on the council planning department or part of the marketing team for one of these companies.

I'm not deluded, nothing I have said is false. I agree the site is an eyesore and something should be done about it but turning Sutton into Croydon by building more highrised buildings is not a good thing in my opinion. I think London should be stopped from its never ending expansion so more of our towns and villages don't get swallowed up. Thats their plan and I don't like it and have never been asked if I wanted it.

You completely ignored my concerns regarding population density and pressure on local amenities or do these things not matter. I think the priority of this council should be the welfare of the people actually living here. More people means more problems.

How can it make huge financial sense? We already have a high street, with room for new shops.

Funny enough, when you talk to people who've lived in Sutton for many years or have left the area they all say that Sutton used to be a nice place to live until about 20 years ago.....until it got too busy and crowded and lost its town feel.
No troll, I comment on many stories on this site. You on the other hand could be connected to this in someway. You write like your on the council planning department or part of the marketing team for one of these companies. I'm not deluded, nothing I have said is false. I agree the site is an eyesore and something should be done about it but turning Sutton into Croydon by building more highrised buildings is not a good thing in my opinion. I think London should be stopped from its never ending expansion so more of our towns and villages don't get swallowed up. Thats their plan and I don't like it and have never been asked if I wanted it. You completely ignored my concerns regarding population density and pressure on local amenities or do these things not matter. I think the priority of this council should be the welfare of the people actually living here. More people means more problems. How can it make huge financial sense? We already have a high street, with room for new shops. Funny enough, when you talk to people who've lived in Sutton for many years or have left the area they all say that Sutton used to be a nice place to live until about 20 years ago.....until it got too busy and crowded and lost its town feel. GreenBrown
  • Score: -2

9:20pm Wed 27 Feb 13

ResidentTony says...

Green Brown - things often seem better in retrospect; it's called nostalgia and is understandable. I lived here 20 years ago and still do, but think it has got somewhat better since then. Sutton certainly was not a sleepy suburb then and in fact I doubt if it is ever really was. The High St goes back to Victorian times and was a major shopping hub over 100 years ago.

You talk about nails in coffins. I see this more as a rebirth than a burial. This is already a high-density bit of the town and this will simply make it high density in an up-to-date and very stylish modern way.

I'm really into good architecture, whether old or new. I oppose new developments which involve demolition of lovely old buildings. I'm really keen that Sutton hangs onto as much of its high quality Victorian and Edwardian buildings as possible. The conservation areas (eg the "Bridgefield Rd" one includes some fantastic houses architecturally. As does the High St - look at the beautiful building above Barclays Bank for instance.

BUT. Nothing of value is being lost here - it's a win-win situation. Some early 1960s sixties buildings make way for some 2015 buildings which will be vastly more attractive than their predecessors This won't make Sutton any more like Croydon than it already is. And BTW Croydon is quietly improving itself while nobody notices. Some really prestigious developments are underway there.

Call me a simpleton if you like, but I do like shiny new things. I admit it! These ones will attract decent people and put a bit more intelligent life into the town centre. It needs a bit more of a residential element. I want an art cinema to replace the trouble-spot disco in Cheam Rd; I'd like a few more Brasserie Vacherin type restaurants to open up. This will make Sutton a more civilised place.

I doubt if the residents will use their cars much as they will have the railway station practically adjacent to them. A few hundred young professionals are not going to spend their days and evenings at the doctors. But they might provide customers for the theatres, bookshops and restaurants present and future which make Sutton a pleasant area.

PS Agree we need to keep the A&E at St Helier and I have applauded the two mums with their 7,000 signatures. Not many have done - perhaps you should before the article closes for new posts.
Green Brown - things often seem better in retrospect; it's called nostalgia and is understandable. I lived here 20 years ago and still do, but think it has got somewhat better since then. Sutton certainly was not a sleepy suburb then and in fact I doubt if it is ever really was. The High St goes back to Victorian times and was a major shopping hub over 100 years ago. You talk about nails in coffins. I see this more as a rebirth than a burial. This is already a high-density bit of the town and this will simply make it high density in an up-to-date and very stylish modern way. I'm really into good architecture, whether old or new. I oppose new developments which involve demolition of lovely old buildings. I'm really keen that Sutton hangs onto as much of its high quality Victorian and Edwardian buildings as possible. The conservation areas (eg the "Bridgefield Rd" one includes some fantastic houses architecturally. As does the High St - look at the beautiful building above Barclays Bank for instance. BUT. Nothing of value is being lost here - it's a win-win situation. Some early 1960s sixties buildings make way for some 2015 buildings which will be vastly more attractive than their predecessors This won't make Sutton any more like Croydon than it already is. And BTW Croydon is quietly improving itself while nobody notices. Some really prestigious developments are underway there. Call me a simpleton if you like, but I do like shiny new things. I admit it! These ones will attract decent people and put a bit more intelligent life into the town centre. It needs a bit more of a residential element. I want an art cinema to replace the trouble-spot disco in Cheam Rd; I'd like a few more Brasserie Vacherin type restaurants to open up. This will make Sutton a more civilised place. I doubt if the residents will use their cars much as they will have the railway station practically adjacent to them. A few hundred young professionals are not going to spend their days and evenings at the doctors. But they might provide customers for the theatres, bookshops and restaurants present and future which make Sutton a pleasant area. PS Agree we need to keep the A&E at St Helier and I have applauded the two mums with their 7,000 signatures. Not many have done - perhaps you should before the article closes for new posts. ResidentTony
  • Score: 2

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