Firefighters urge drunken cooks to get themselves a takeaway during pension strikes

Sutton Guardian: London Fire Brigade boss Ron Dobson said it would be safer to ''grab a kebab' than cooking drunk London Fire Brigade boss Ron Dobson said it would be safer to ''grab a kebab' than cooking drunk

Firefighters have urged drunken partygoers to get themselves a takeaway while they are on strike.

The Fire Brigades Union is staging two further strikes this weekend and has asked people to avoid cooking if they have been out drinking at a Christmas party in case they cause a fire.

Firefighters will strike from 6pm to 10pm on Friday and Saturday evenings.

London Fire Brigade's commissioner Ron Dobson said: "I imagine a lot of people will be out drinking and celebrating Christmas this Friday and Saturday night, at the same time the Fire Brigades Union are on strike.

"I am genuinely concerned about people coming home from pubs or Christmas parties and trying to cook. Alcohol and cooking is a recipe for disaster as it’s easy to fall asleep and leave cooking on the hob.

"If you’re out drinking on Friday or Saturday it’s much safer to grab a kebab or some chips than trying to cook under the influence."

Firefighters are striking over changes to their pensions.

While they are on strike just 27 fire engines will cover London and will not attend incidents like grass fires, rubbish fires, animal rescues and people shut in lifts.

Comments (9)

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8:38am Fri 13 Dec 13

Binsanity says...

Which is exactly why they are striking at those times. Has every arbitrary avenue been looked at or are they to busy with their second jobs.
Which is exactly why they are striking at those times. Has every arbitrary avenue been looked at or are they to busy with their second jobs. Binsanity

9:14am Fri 13 Dec 13

aspicer says...

A week after the R&TT have a story about a local fireman retiring at age 51, and during the same week the Chancellor ups the State Pension age for many workers to 69.
Why do firemen think it is accepetable for others to work to 69, to pay for their pensions they have already been claiming for 18 years.
Unafforable and should be abolished. Minimum retirement age for them must be lifted to 65 years.
A week after the R&TT have a story about a local fireman retiring at age 51, and during the same week the Chancellor ups the State Pension age for many workers to 69. Why do firemen think it is accepetable for others to work to 69, to pay for their pensions they have already been claiming for 18 years. Unafforable and should be abolished. Minimum retirement age for them must be lifted to 65 years. aspicer

9:50am Fri 13 Dec 13

Niki R says...

Would you like to rely on a 64 year old fireman with arthritis to get you out of a burning building? These people put their lives on the line for us, have paid into a pension in good faith and are now being told that pension is vastly devalued.

The lack of respect shown to them is appalling. Some have 'second jobs' because firefighters pay has been comparatively low in the past, and they have families to support too.

Try putting yourself in their shoes. Would you be willing to enter a hazardous environment and risk your own safety to save a stranger?

It's the old truth yet again on these pages- "those that can, do, those that can't, criticise,"
Would you like to rely on a 64 year old fireman with arthritis to get you out of a burning building? These people put their lives on the line for us, have paid into a pension in good faith and are now being told that pension is vastly devalued. The lack of respect shown to them is appalling. Some have 'second jobs' because firefighters pay has been comparatively low in the past, and they have families to support too. Try putting yourself in their shoes. Would you be willing to enter a hazardous environment and risk your own safety to save a stranger? It's the old truth yet again on these pages- "those that can, do, those that can't, criticise," Niki R

10:12am Fri 13 Dec 13

DB says...

The problem is that a lot of public sector pensions were not reigned in soon enough. I can see exactly where they are coming from because if I paid into a pension and was told I could retire at 55, then I would expect to be able to do that.

What should have happened is that they stopped promising that to new entrants to the brigade at around the same time the private sector realised that their own final salary schemes were unaffordable.

I don't think a lot of firefighters truly think they are that badly off. I have known several examples of multiple generations of the same family are firefighters. I am sure they love the job, but I doubt they'd all do it if they really believed they could get vastly better pay and conditions elsewhere.
The problem is that a lot of public sector pensions were not reigned in soon enough. I can see exactly where they are coming from because if I paid into a pension and was told I could retire at 55, then I would expect to be able to do that. What should have happened is that they stopped promising that to new entrants to the brigade at around the same time the private sector realised that their own final salary schemes were unaffordable. I don't think a lot of firefighters truly think they are that badly off. I have known several examples of multiple generations of the same family are firefighters. I am sure they love the job, but I doubt they'd all do it if they really believed they could get vastly better pay and conditions elsewhere. DB

1:49pm Fri 13 Dec 13

kingstonpaul says...

I think the point about staying physically fit long enough is a fair one. It's an absurd notion that a 60 year-old shouldbe expected to perform a fireman's lift.
But surely there must be ways of migrating front-line firemen into back-office roles when the phyisical demands of the job are too much?
I think the point about staying physically fit long enough is a fair one. It's an absurd notion that a 60 year-old shouldbe expected to perform a fireman's lift. But surely there must be ways of migrating front-line firemen into back-office roles when the phyisical demands of the job are too much? kingstonpaul

2:28pm Fri 13 Dec 13

Michael Pantlin says...

No animal rescues = no support for firemen from me.
No animal rescues = no support for firemen from me. Michael Pantlin

2:37pm Fri 13 Dec 13

EdwinaWaugh says...

kingstonpaul says...
Sensible comment!
kingstonpaul says... Sensible comment! EdwinaWaugh

5:14pm Fri 13 Dec 13

Binsanity says...

"Fire fighters have second jobs because their pay is comparatively low". ****, they have a secure job unlike most of the populace who don't have time for a second job and are paid less.
"Fire fighters have second jobs because their pay is comparatively low". ****, they have a secure job unlike most of the populace who don't have time for a second job and are paid less. Binsanity

2:01pm Mon 16 Dec 13

emelem says...

Alcohol and cooking is a recipe for disaster.... er, red wine sauce? ;)

seriously, tho... "While they are on strike just 27 fire engines will cover London and will not attend incidents like grass fires, rubbish fires, animal rescues and people shut in lifts." ---who will then?

and it is really a sad state of affairs if someone gets so drunk they can't attempt to cook a meal without burning their house down... forget calling the firefighters, call AA.
Alcohol and cooking is a recipe for disaster.... er, red wine sauce? ;) seriously, tho... "While they are on strike just 27 fire engines will cover London and will not attend incidents like grass fires, rubbish fires, animal rescues and people shut in lifts." ---who will then? and it is really a sad state of affairs if someone gets so drunk they can't attempt to cook a meal without burning their house down... forget calling the firefighters, call AA. emelem

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