Calls for Carshalton lollipop lady to be honoured by the Queen after 48 years' service

Sutton Guardian: Florence Adams and Sutton mayor, Councillor Sean Brennan Florence Adams and Sutton mayor, Councillor Sean Brennan

The mayor has called for a lollipop lady who has been helping children get to school safely for almost 50 years to get recognition from the Queen.

Florence Adams, 86, has been a crossing patrol officer - better known as a lollipop lady - outside St Philomena's Catholic High School for Girls in Carshalton for 48 years and said she has no plans to stop as she loves her job.

Sutton Guardian:

From left: Deputy mayor Coun Sur Steers, mayor Coun Sean Brennan, Florence Adams and Julie Lewis

She was given an award for giving outstanding service to the borough by keeping Sutton safe at last week's Sutton Community Awards and was invited to take tea with Sutton mayor Councillor Sean Brennan on Tuesday.

Croydon lollipop lady June Rixson was given a British Empire Medal by the Queen last year for 35 years' service and Coun Brennan has called for Mrs Adams to be given similar recognition.

After being given her award by Sutton Council, Mrs Adams said: "I’m proud and very pleased to receive this award. I love doing my job. For me the children are my first priority - I love them all.  I love seeing them grow up and I will keep doing this job for as long as I can."

Both Mrs Adams and her daughter Julie Lewis visited Coun Brennan's parlour for tea on Tuesday.

Coun Brennan said: "Florence is a shining example of community spirit at its best. She deserves local and indeed national recognition for her 48 years of hard work and dedication. She is a real credit to the London Borough of Sutton".  

To nominate Mrs Adams for an  award you can visit www.gov.uk/honours.


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Comments (1)

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2:43pm Wed 26 Feb 14

Michael Pantlin says...

The Honours System is not transparent. If a mayor or politician calls for it, chances are it might happen but when an ordinary citizen applies for recognition of a most special person now in their nineties who has tirelessly helped others through their most serious medical problems across the borough for many decades a sheaf of supporting letters is provided, the application is likely to end up in some posh office's waste paper bin.
The Honours System is not transparent. If a mayor or politician calls for it, chances are it might happen but when an ordinary citizen applies for recognition of a most special person now in their nineties who has tirelessly helped others through their most serious medical problems across the borough for many decades a sheaf of supporting letters is provided, the application is likely to end up in some posh office's waste paper bin. Michael Pantlin
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