Controversial dome planning application at Nonsuch High School, Cheam, to be withdrawn

Controversial dome planning application to be withdrawn

How the 45ft dome would look according to campaigners

How the 45ft dome would look after planting according to the school

First published in News
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Plans to build a controversial, 45ft-high sports dome next to a nature reserve in Cheam are to be withdrawn.

Word of the move has sparked excitement among campaigners who are battling to stop Nonsuch High School from building the dome.

Several rang the Epsom Guardian this afternoon hoping that this was a sign that the school was abandoning the proposal.

But, although Epsom Council confirmed that the plans are being withdrawn, although they are currently still on its website, it is believed that the school intends to submit fresh plans with a smaller dome, and is not scrapping the dome itself.

Earlier this week the headmaster, Peter Gale, said that it was looking at reducing the height to 35ft.

He said: "We are considering lowering after listening to some of the points made by local councillors and residents. The school is very happy to listen to practical suggestions that help all interested parties.

"We are very happy to work with local residents to support a 20mph speed limit outside the school.

"There will be more than 51 car parking spaces available on site in the evening, since the existing staff car parks would become available.

"We are considering how we could improve pedestrian/cycle access. There would be little extra traffic at peak times."

Noone was available for comment at the school this afternoon.

Comments (6)

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10:01am Sat 10 May 14

Mr S.P Williams says...

I think its really important that Nonsuch school MEET with residents to hear their concerns.

Lowering the dome height does not address many peoples concerns about noise and light pollution and it would still also be visible as the hedge is low along the boundary between the school and Warren Farm.

Residents of Anne Boleyns Walk, Jubilee Road, Roberts Close and Queens Acre and will still face an increase in numbers of cars up until 10pm at night and parking problems associated with the increased traffic.

The school already HAS use of extensive David Lloyd facilities including pool, tennis courts and an all weather hockey pitch. This facility is more about making money than providing the students with sporting facilities.
I think its really important that Nonsuch school MEET with residents to hear their concerns. Lowering the dome height does not address many peoples concerns about noise and light pollution and it would still also be visible as the hedge is low along the boundary between the school and Warren Farm. Residents of Anne Boleyns Walk, Jubilee Road, Roberts Close and Queens Acre and will still face an increase in numbers of cars up until 10pm at night and parking problems associated with the increased traffic. The school already HAS use of extensive David Lloyd facilities including pool, tennis courts and an all weather hockey pitch. This facility is more about making money than providing the students with sporting facilities. Mr S.P Williams
  • Score: 9

12:36pm Sat 10 May 14

Michael Pantlin says...

The long term solution is to reduce the pressure on schools to expand by reducing the over population by tackling excessive breeding and immigration. Among the penalties for not so doing will be everyone feeling hemmed in by building monstrosities and a lack of quiet places to escape to for vital relaxation and recuperatiion.
The long term solution is to reduce the pressure on schools to expand by reducing the over population by tackling excessive breeding and immigration. Among the penalties for not so doing will be everyone feeling hemmed in by building monstrosities and a lack of quiet places to escape to for vital relaxation and recuperatiion. Michael Pantlin
  • Score: -7

5:25pm Sat 10 May 14

labyrinth says...

Michael Pantlin wrote:
The long term solution is to reduce the pressure on schools to expand by reducing the over population by tackling excessive breeding and immigration. Among the penalties for not so doing will be everyone feeling hemmed in by building monstrosities and a lack of quiet places to escape to for vital relaxation and recuperatiion.
Actually, there is no need for anyone to feel hemmed in in relation to this proposal, since there is no need at all for the school to build this monstrous dome, which is a commercial enterprise to fund the school's expansion. The solution to the problem, is for schools like this one to stop being Magnet schools, open to pupils from miles away, and to return to what it was, which was a school serving pupils in the borough of Sutton and the neighbouring borough of Epsom and Ewell.
[quote][p][bold]Michael Pantlin[/bold] wrote: The long term solution is to reduce the pressure on schools to expand by reducing the over population by tackling excessive breeding and immigration. Among the penalties for not so doing will be everyone feeling hemmed in by building monstrosities and a lack of quiet places to escape to for vital relaxation and recuperatiion.[/p][/quote]Actually, there is no need for anyone to feel hemmed in in relation to this proposal, since there is no need at all for the school to build this monstrous dome, which is a commercial enterprise to fund the school's expansion. The solution to the problem, is for schools like this one to stop being Magnet schools, open to pupils from miles away, and to return to what it was, which was a school serving pupils in the borough of Sutton and the neighbouring borough of Epsom and Ewell. labyrinth
  • Score: 6

5:31pm Sat 10 May 14

labyrinth says...

Mr S.P Williams wrote:
I think its really important that Nonsuch school MEET with residents to hear their concerns.

Lowering the dome height does not address many peoples concerns about noise and light pollution and it would still also be visible as the hedge is low along the boundary between the school and Warren Farm.

Residents of Anne Boleyns Walk, Jubilee Road, Roberts Close and Queens Acre and will still face an increase in numbers of cars up until 10pm at night and parking problems associated with the increased traffic.

The school already HAS use of extensive David Lloyd facilities including pool, tennis courts and an all weather hockey pitch. This facility is more about making money than providing the students with sporting facilities.
Yes - the school does indeed already have excellent facilities, and these already affect the area in that people drive to the David Llloyd centre on the school's site - but of course that was built in the face of local opposition, which was ignored.

If this thing goes ahead, the noise will be extremely intrusive, especially in the evenings from the floodlit pitches. But of course, the minute those who would have their quality of life destroyed, even mention these issues, the cry of 'Nimby!" goes up - as fatuous a term as ever existed, given that no one wants such things near to them when they are totally unnecessary - we are not talking about homes here! It's notable that the vast majority of those approving of this thing, have addresses miles away; no doubt the same people who buzz along local side roads at 50 mph!
[quote][p][bold]Mr S.P Williams[/bold] wrote: I think its really important that Nonsuch school MEET with residents to hear their concerns. Lowering the dome height does not address many peoples concerns about noise and light pollution and it would still also be visible as the hedge is low along the boundary between the school and Warren Farm. Residents of Anne Boleyns Walk, Jubilee Road, Roberts Close and Queens Acre and will still face an increase in numbers of cars up until 10pm at night and parking problems associated with the increased traffic. The school already HAS use of extensive David Lloyd facilities including pool, tennis courts and an all weather hockey pitch. This facility is more about making money than providing the students with sporting facilities.[/p][/quote]Yes - the school does indeed already have excellent facilities, and these already affect the area in that people drive to the David Llloyd centre on the school's site - but of course that was built in the face of local opposition, which was ignored. If this thing goes ahead, the noise will be extremely intrusive, especially in the evenings from the floodlit pitches. But of course, the minute those who would have their quality of life destroyed, even mention these issues, the cry of 'Nimby!" goes up - as fatuous a term as ever existed, given that no one wants such things near to them when they are totally unnecessary - we are not talking about homes here! It's notable that the vast majority of those approving of this thing, have addresses miles away; no doubt the same people who buzz along local side roads at 50 mph! labyrinth
  • Score: 4

10:02pm Sat 10 May 14

Monstermunch17 says...

Get a grip. Some people live close to incinerators, airports, power plants. You sound ridiculous complaining about the 'extremely intrusive' noise of floodlit football pitches.
Get a grip. Some people live close to incinerators, airports, power plants. You sound ridiculous complaining about the 'extremely intrusive' noise of floodlit football pitches. Monstermunch17
  • Score: -4

9:32pm Thu 15 May 14

labyrinth says...

Monstermunch17 wrote:
Get a grip. Some people live close to incinerators, airports, power plants. You sound ridiculous complaining about the 'extremely intrusive' noise of floodlit football pitches.
It is you who need to 'get a grip.' If we lived near an airport / incinerator /. power plant, then that would have been something to regard as an issue when buying the home, and the presence of such structures would definitely mean that we would have paid a low price for the property. However, we did not buy near such things, for the reason that we want a quiet life - and we are clearly not alone in that.
[quote][p][bold]Monstermunch17[/bold] wrote: Get a grip. Some people live close to incinerators, airports, power plants. You sound ridiculous complaining about the 'extremely intrusive' noise of floodlit football pitches.[/p][/quote]It is you who need to 'get a grip.' If we lived near an airport / incinerator /. power plant, then that would have been something to regard as an issue when buying the home, and the presence of such structures would definitely mean that we would have paid a low price for the property. However, we did not buy near such things, for the reason that we want a quiet life - and we are clearly not alone in that. labyrinth
  • Score: 0

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